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Siamese

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Breed Profile
Siamese cat posing
A cute Siamese cat.

Other Name(s)

Moon Diamond, Royal Cat, and Lilac-point Siamese

Country of Origin

Thailand

Breed Group

Shorthair

Weight

Male: 9 - 14 pounds (4 - 6.5 kg)

Female: 6 - 10 pounds (2.7 - 4.8 kg)

Height

Male: 12 - 15 in. (29 - 31 cm)

Female: 12 - 15 in. (27 - 31 cm)

Size

Medium

Coat

Solid, Tabby and Tortoise Shell (Tortie)

Color(s)

White, black, brown and silver

Litter Size

3 - 6 kittens

Life Span

9 - 15 years

Characteristics Ratings
Siamese wallpaper
A royal Siamese.

Behaviour

6/10

Training Easiness

9/10

Grooming Requirements

4/10

Exercise Requirements

5/10

Watchdog Ability

6/10

The Siamese is one of the best-known cat breeds. Its impressive and fearless character had been admired for thousands of years by human. Today, this intelligent and obedient cat is also a great companion pet.

History Edit

Siamese cat 2

The Siamese is a cat breed which has been in Thailand for many centuries. Known there as the Vichien Mat, it seems to have been a pet for royal and nobility. A tradition tells us on how one of these cats was placed in the tomb of deceased emperors and that when it emerged through a hole specially left, it was thought to have carried the soul of the dead from the grave of its first stage of its journey to the next life.Siamese cats got their nam from Thailand wich used to be called Siam. Although Siamese cats were already in the West and seen at early British cat shows, they may not have had the clear pointed pattern with which the breed is now identified. Indeed cats with coats darker than the extremities had even been reported else where in the world long before. The first well authenticated example to be sent from Thailand was a gift sent to a wife of America's president Hayes in 1878. Sadly, she did not long survive her arrival in the Washington. A British Consul who acquired a pair sent them to England in 1884 and there his sister , Lilian Velvey, proceeded to breed them. She later imported more, probably from the cattery which her brother established in Bangkok. Since then breeders have created an elegant Siamese cat that has become more exaggeratedly slim and angular.

The modern Siamese is lithe and muscular with a graceful, svelte body of medium size, its hips never wider than the shoulders to give sleek tubular lines. The legs are long and slim, the hind legs are higher than the front with a small oval paws. The tail is long and tapers to a point. The elegant neck carries a long head with width between the ears, narrowing in tapering wedge with perfectly straight lines to a fine muzzle, with a straight profile. It also has a long chin and a level bite. The ears are large , pointed , wide at the base and continue the lines of the head. The eyes are almond shaped and slant towards the nose but with width between. They are always a vivid blue, the deeper the better.

By the time modern Siamese became famous new colors and patterns were created. In 1948 Dr.Nora Archer obtained, from Mrs.Price, a Red Point male kitten, Somerville Scarlet Pimpernel, whose sire was a Seal Point and whose dam was a tortoiseshell half-Siamese. This Red Point was mated to a Seal Point female, Doneraile Dew, to produce a Tortie Point, Somerville Harlequinna, whose daughter. Somerville Golden Seal, was the first Red Point female. Dr.Archer bred back to Seal Points to improve type.

Miss Ray had a Tortie Point cat from Dr.Archer and mated it to a Seal Point male to produce a Red Point male who was mated back to his mother to give a Red Point female. Miss Ray then bred five generations of Red Point to Red Point matings.
Traditional Siamese 2

Miss Ray applied twice to the Governing Council of the Cat Fancy for a breed number and recognition of her cats as Siamese, but this was refused. The GCCF suggested to Miss Ray that Red Points should be offered a breed number under the description "Foreign Shorthair": this was unacceptable to Miss Ray and other Red Point breeders because it ignored the fact that these cats were Siamese in type, eye colour and distribution of colour, and that after ten generations from the original outcross they were genetically Siamese.

Miss Ray hoped to start a club for Red Point breeders and it was in fact started, just before her death, by Mrs.Lingard and Mrs.Cahill. The club was open to anyone interested in Red Points, whether breeders or not, and prepared material on the background of Red Points to support a new application to the GCCF.

In 1966 Red Points were granted breed number 32a and Seal Tortie Points 32b, with immediate championship status. Blue, Chocolate and Lilac Tortie Points and Cream Points were classified as breed number 32c - Any Other Dilution Siamese.

In May 1967 the Red Point and Tortie Point Siamese Cat Club was granted affiliation to the GCCF.

In February 1971 the revised Standard of Points for Tortie Points was approved and Blue, Chocolate and Lilac Tortie Points were transferred to breed number 32b, with championship status. This left the Cream Points in 32c with red, cream and tortie Tabby Points and all other unclassified Siamese.

Traditional Siamese

In October 1973 red, cream and tortie Tabby Points were accepted as breed 32, with championship status, leaving 32c to Cream Points and the occasional by-product of other breeding programmes. In 1974 the Club asked for championship status for Cream Points: this was refused but an official Standard of Points for Cream Points was approved and they were granted sole use of breed number 32c, 32x being allocated to any other colour of Siamese as yet unrecognised.

Cream Points finally attained championship status on 1st June 1977.

In February 1979 the GCCF gave permission for Tortie Point breed numbers to be split, for registration purposes only, as follows: seal, blue, chocolate and lilac.

In February 1980 the GCCF approved revised Standards of Points for all Siamese, including those for Red, Tortie and Cream Points. The Siamese section of the Standard of Points then remained totally unchanged until 1990, although the "List of Defects" which applies to all breeds was approved in June 1985 and prefaced the Standard of Points booklet when it was reprinted in 1986.

Seal Point Siamese 2

In October 1990 the 5 points for condition were deleted from the Siamese Scale of Points (as lack of condition was listed as a withholding fault in the preface) and the points for body colour were increased to 15. The faults were also amended: some were deleted because they were listed in the preface and others were upgraded from faults to withholding faults. The remainder of the Standard of Points was unchanged. When the Standard of Points booklet was reprinted in September 1992, the Standards were revised so that all breeds were described in a similar order - head, body, tail, coat, colour etc. - although the wording remained basically unaltered.

In June 1993, slight amendments to the general Standard for all Siamese, including the withholding faults, and revised Standards of Points for Seal, Red, Tortie and Cream Point Siamese were approved, to take effect from 1st June 1994. (A revised Standard for Tabby Points was approved in October 1992.)

In October 1993,Cinnamon, Caramel and Fawn Tortie Points were granted Preliminary recognition (together with Cinnamon, Caramel and Fawn Points and Cinnamon, Caramel, Fawn, Cinnamon Tortie, Caramel Tortie and Fawn Tortie Tabby Points); for the first time since June 1983, when Balinese were granted Provisional status, the Siamese section had Assessment classes.

In June 1998 Apricot Points (and Apricot Tabby Points) were also granted Preliminary recognition and joined the Assessment class.

In June 2000 the Caramel Tortie Points moved from the Assessment class to join the other colours of Tortie Point in the Championship status class.

In June 2004 the Cinnamon and Fawn Tortie Points moved from the Assessment class to the Championship status class with the other colours of Tortie Point, and Apricot Points gained Provisional recognition.

Breed Description Edit

Siamese cat

Coat Edit

The glossy coat of the Siamese is short, fine in texture and close lying. It should be an even colour on the body with subtle shading , if any on the back and sides. The darker areas, the points and mask so characteristics of the breed, should be clearly defined but restricted to the tail, feet, ears and face. The mask should cover the face, including the whisker pads, and be connected to the ear by the tracings, but should not cover the top of the head. Mask and other patches are usually are either black or brown. The gene which produces the pointed restriction also dilutes the Siamese cats, although the colour was seal , were dilute form of black. Seal was the only colour recognized until the 1930s, when blue became accepted. In the 1950s Chocolate was acknowledged to be a different colour, and then lilac (or Frost Point, as it was first called in America) was accepted. Now a whole range of colours and patterned points have been produced , recognized by the GCCF in Britain as Siamese, but classed separately by some cat societies. There are also unpointed versions which are seen as different breeds.


Overview Edit

Cream Point Siamese 2

The Siamese breed has become one of the most popular in the world, because of it's beautiful appearance and distinctive personality. It is one of the oldest breeds of domestic cats known to man, originating from Asia. It's oriental heritage is very interesting, and the name 'siamese' comes from Siam, which is now known as Thailand. According to some legends, the Siamese was once considered sacred, and kept in temples by priests, and people of extreme importance.


Character Edit

Attractive Flame Point Siamese

Siamese are affectionate and demanding of attention. They can be decidedly vocal, even conversational and sometimes have a raucous voice. They are known to be very vocal and demanding cats, with superior intelligence and great affection for their human friends. Siamese cats are very active and make a great pet for people that enjoy spending a lot of time with their animals. Siameses are also curious and active cats.


Temperament Edit

Lillac Point Siamese kitten 2

Siameses are affectionate and intelligent cats, renowned for their social nature. Many enjoy being with people and are sometimes described as "extroverts". As there are extrovert Siameses, there also are some that have very sensitive and nervous temperaments. Those individuals may not easily adapt to the changes of environment or to strangers. They do have a great need for human companionship. Often they bond strongly to a single person. Most Siameses like to have other sociable cats for company and do not thrive as only cats owned by people who are gone much of the day. Siameses are extremely vocal, with a loud, low-pitched voice – known as Meezer, from which they get one of their nicknames – that has been compared to the cries of a human baby, and persistent in demanding attention. These cats are typically active and playful, even as adults.

The social orientation of Siamese cats may be related to their lessened ability to live independent of humans. Siameses coat colouration is appealing to humans, but is ineffective for camouflage purposes. They are less active at night than most cats, possibly because their blue eyes lack a tapetum lucidum, a structure which amplifies dim light in the eyes of other cats. The mutation in the tyrosinase also results in abnormal neurological connections between the eye and the brain. Unlike blue-eyed white cats, Siamese cats do not have reduced hearing ability. The deafness that sometimes occurs in completely white cats is a result of the genetics that causes the loss of pigment cells in the skin, which has nothing to do with the tyrosinase gene defect that causes Siamese color. Regardless, being dependent on humans may have been a survival trait for ancestors of the Siamese.


Care Edit

Lillac Point Siamese headshot

Grooming and Bathing Edit

Siamese cats generally have smooth fine hair, so grooming and maintaining the coat is not an issue and they do a good job of keeping themselves clean. You will want to occasionally brush them, as it will help with shedding.

Bathing is not usually necessary, unless their coat is unusually dirty do to outside elements or other factors.

Feeding Edit

You need to provide a constant supply of food and water for your Siamese. It is recommended that they always have access to dry food and fresh water. Wet food may be something that you want to consider giving them, depending on what their diet calls for. It is probably a good idea to change their water out a couple of times per day, as hair and other airborne things tend to settle in the water.

You should stick with trusted food brands such as Iams or Science Diet, and buy a formula that is specific for the size of your cat and its health needs (i.e. kitten formula, hairball formula, etc.)

If you plan to go on a trip, or will be away from your house for an extended amount of time, consider using self feeding and watering products that have a large capacity tank or container that keeps the food and water flowing. You can also ask a friend or relative to come over and make sure their food and water supply is ok.

Environment and Safety Edit

Before buying a Siamese cat, you should examine your environment and figure out what risks, if any, exist for a potential feline companion. A new kitten will be curious and want to explore its new home, and many dangers may present themselves if not protected against.

Take care to close off any dangerous places where a kitten can get stuck, including washers and dryers, old refrigerators, and basements with sump pumps that have an opening.

Beyond physical dangers, you must consider the other humans living around you and how they will interact with a new cat in the house. Children are the top concern, and you need to make sure that they are supervised at all times around your new Siamese.

Red-Flame Point Siamese

Make sure that your Siamese has its own set of toys to play with. This will help keep your cat healthy and happy and reduce the risk that they will get into trouble on their own.

If you take the steps to provide a safe environment, then you will have nothing to worry about when your furry buddy is roaming the house.

Litter Box Edit

Keeping a clean litter box is one of the most important chores in owning a Siamese cat. We recommend using a clay type litter such as Tidy Cats, and scooping it out one or two times a day. (Clumping litter is not recommended, as cats can ingest it and then it will expand, causing blockages and other dangerous health risks). You should actually change the litter out at least once a week and clean the box itself before filling up with new litter.

If you have or plan on getting more than one cat, you should consider getting the largest box possible, or maybe even two. The litter box should be placed in a low traffic and quiet area of the house. Your Siamese will appreciate the privacy!


Training Edit

Siamese kitten

When attempting to train your stubborn Siamese out of these habits, you may find yourself frustrated. Pet owners often make certain mistakes when trying to train their pets. Siamese cats can be particularly frustrating. It helps to remember these three things:

  1. Firstly, remember that your cat learns at the moment of the action. After the cat has scratched the furniture or gotten off the counter is not the time to punish them. This is one problem with the squirt gun approach. The cat has nearly finished with the behavior before you, as the owner, are able to get there with the squirt gun. If you say no to a cat, it may listen and then do exactly what they want a moment later—the time of the “no” has passed.
  2. Secondly, be consistent. This can be difficult if your cat loves to be on the counters while you are at work or in another room. You might hear them and come running. However, the cat has learned that they just need to not get caught. Remember the first thing, you need to train during the event.
  3. Thirdly, let your environment do the work. This is probably the most effective training method. Spray something the cat doesn’t like on the nice sofa to keep them from scratching that and make the scratching post very available. Citrus scents work well as cats dislike this smell. Another idea is to place double sided tape where the cat scratches. It can also be placed on counters. Low jelly-roll pans filled with water along the counter can be useful for a short retraining. This is actually more effective than the noisemakers that are sold. Siamese are light footed and can thwart the sensors on these.

The environment can be consistent in its application of punishment. It is always there when the cat performs the action. The environment is the perfect teacher. You can sit back and reward your cat with treats when they do the things you want them to do. You can enjoy the house the way you want your house, while still enjoying the love of your Siamese cat.


Activity Edit

Siamese cat playing

Siameses have the long athletic lines as well as the ability to jump well. They can easily navigate countertops or cooking spaces that might be off limits. Because they tend to be easily excitable, they may also scratch on surfaces that are not appropriate, like the formal living room sofa.


Ownership Edit

The costs of buying a Siamese cat or kitten can vary greatly from a siamese breeder. We recommend that you research the breed before buying a Siamese. Their vocal nature and demanding personality may not be a good match for a select few, but most will not be able to resist the charm and beauty of the Siamese cat!

Apperance Edit

The breed standard of the Modern Siamese indicates an elegant, slim, stylish, flexible and well muscled body. Its head is triangular shaped, with a thin snout. The eyes are almond-shaped and oblique, the ears large and thin. It has a long neck, body and tail. The fur is short, glossy, fine, soft, tight and adhered to the body. The Siamese is characterized by its typical pointed color scheme.

Siamese reclining

The pointed pattern is a form of partial albinism, resulting from a mutation in tyrosinase, an enzyme involved in melanin production. The mutated enzyme is heat-sensitive; it fails to work at normal body temperatures, but becomes active in cooler areas of the skin. This results in dark colouration in the coolest parts of the cat's body, including the extremities and the face, which is cooled by the passage of air through the sinuses. All Siamese kittens, although pure cream or white at birth, develop visible points in the first few months of life in colder parts of their body. By the time a kitten is four weeks old the points should be clearly distinguishable enough to recognise which colour they are. Siamese cats tend to darken with age, and generally adult Siamese living in warm climates have lighter coats than those in cool climates. Originally the vast majority of Siamese had Seal (extremely dark brown, almost black) Points, but occasionally Siamese were born with Blue (a cool grey) Points, genetically a dilution of Seal Point and Chocolate (lighter brown) Points, a genetic variation of Seal point; or Lilac (pale warm gray) Points, genetically a diluted chocolate. These colours were at first considered "inferior" Seal Points and were not qualified for showing or breeding. All of these shades were eventually accepted by the breed associations and became more common through breeding programmes specifically aimed at producing these colours. Later, outcrosses with other breeds developed Siamese-mix cats with points in other cat colours and patterns including Flame Point, Lynx (tabby) point, and Tortoise Shell (tortie) point.

Flame Point Siamese

In the United Kingdom, all pointed Siamese-style cats are considered to be part of the Siamese breed. In the United States, the major cat registry, the Cat Fanciers' Association, considers only the four original colourations as Siamese: Seal Point, Blue Point, Chocolate Point, and Lilac Point. Oriental Shorthair cats with colourpoints in colours or patterns aside from these four are considered Colorpoint Shorthairs in the American cat fancy. This Siamese cat demonstrates the once common cross-eyed trait that has been largely been bred out. Many Siamese cats from Thailand had a kink in their tails but over the years this trait has been considered to be a flaw and breeders have largely eradicated it, although it persists among street cats in Thailand. Many early Siamese were cross-eyed to compensate for the abnormal uncrossed wiring of the optic chiasm, which is produced by the same albino allele that produces coloured points. Like the kinked tails, the crossed eyes have been seen as a fault and through selective breeding, the trait is far less common today.

Siamese cat lying

The Thai or Traditional Siamese shares some features with the Modern Siamese (e.g., the color pattern) but differs from it by their rounded shapes. It has a more compact body and an applehead, with full and rounded cheeks, shorter snout, ears high, but not huge. The eyes are medium to slightly large, a very full almond shape, but not oriental.

Colors and Patterns Edit

Siameses have a variety of unique, different coats but, in some governing bodies (e.g. CFA) only the four original colors are accepted as Siamese coloring and color point or point restricted the only accepted pattern. The four original colors are:

Seal Point Edit

Seal Point Siamese

The traditional colour of a Siamese cat is Seal Point. The sensational colour pattern of pale creamy coat shading to dense seal brown points and clear brilliant deep blue eyes first set their paws on the road to fame in the late 1800's.

Blue Point Edit

Blue Point Siamese

According to the records the first Blue Point Siamese was exhibited in England, in 1890. The points are grey and blue and the body colour glacial white, shading gradually to the same cold tone as the points.


Chocolate Point Edit

Chocolate Point Siamese

The colour standard for a Chocolate Point requires the points to be the colour of a bar of chocolate, and the body colouring ivory all over, with very little shading. Chocolate Points appeared in litters as early as 1900. However, it was many years later before they were officially recognised.

Liliac Point Edit

Lillac Point Siamese 2

Lilac Point Siamese are derived from matings between Siamese carrying both chocolate and blue colouring. These Siamese have delicate mushroom pink points, faded lilac pads and nose leather and their blue eyes contrast well with their off-white (magnolia) body colouring.


Experimental Colors Edit

These colors are not confirmed yet. However, they are magnificent patterns and it is possible to be added to the official coat list of the Siamese cat breed.

Red/Flame Point Edit

Red Point Siamese lying

With a point colour ranging from apricot to red and white body colouring Siamese of this colouring can trace their beginnings back to a planned mating in the 1940’s.

Eyes: Brilliant intense blue, the deeper the better.

Points: Mask, ears and tail rich bright reddish gold. The legs and feet will be paler in colour but the bright colour should show at the rear of the hind legs below the hock. Barring and striping on mask, legs and tail is permissible. "Freckles" may occur on nose, pads, lips, eyelids and ears. Slight freckling in a mature cat should not be penalised. Body: Warm white. Shading, if any, to tone with the points. Such shading may be uneven and a Red Point should be penalised for shading no more nor less severely than a Seal Point.

Nose Leather, Eye Rims & Paw Pads: Pink.

Cream Point Edit

Cream Point Siamese

The fur is cream-shaded and is marked with some pretty cream points.

Eyes: Brilliant intense blue, the deeper the better.

Points: Mask, ears and tail cool toned cream with a powdery look. A dark but cool toned cream is permissible but a hot cream is incorrect. The legs and feet will be slightly paler in colour but definite colour should show at the rear of the hind legs below the hock. Barring and striping on mask, legs and tail is permissible. "Freckles" may occur on nose, pads, lips, eyelids and ears. Slight freckling in a mature cat should not be penalised.

Body: Creamy white. Shading, if any, to tone with the points. Such shading may be uneven and a Cream Point should be penalised for shading no more nor less severely than a Blue Point.

Nose Leather, Eye Rims & Paw Pads: Pink.


Blue Cream Point Edit
Blue Cream Point Siamese kitten

Body: Bluish white to platinum grey, cold in tone shading to lighter color on stomach and chest. Body color may be mottled in older cats.

Points: Deep blue-grey randomly mottled with cream.

Leather, Eye Rims & Paw Pads: Slate colored; flesh or coral pink mottling desirable.

Lilac Cream Point Edit
Lilac Cream Point Siamese kitten

Body: Glacial white; mottling if any in the shades of the points.

Points: Frosty grey with pinkish tone, randomly mottled with pale cream.

Leather, Eye Rims & Paw Pads: Lavender-pink; flesh or coral pink mottling desirable.


Tortoise Shell (Tortie) Point Edit

Tortie Siamese

With their tortoiseshell patterning the Naughty Torties as they are affectionately known, have a mixture of colour on their points and mottled shading on their otherwise pale bodies. They are closely linked to the Red Point Siamese and as with torties of other breeds; are almost exclusively female. Eyes: Brilliant intense blue, the deeper the better.

Points: The base colour is patched and/or mingled at random with varying shades of red, cream or apricot; any large areas of red, cream or apricot may show some striping. Points need not be evenly broken but each point must show some break in colour no matter how small; broken pad colour constitutes a break in colour on that leg. Presence or absence of a blaze is immaterial.

Body: Pale, showing clear contrast with the points as in the equivalent solid-pointed Siamese. Any shading will show patching or mingling and a Tortie Point should be penalised for shading no more nor less severely than the equivalent solid-pointed Siamese.

Nose Leather, Eye Rims & Paw Pads: In accordance with the base colour and/or pink.

Seal Tortie Point Edit
Seal Tortie Siamese

Points: Seal brown with shades of red.

Body: Cream. Shading, if any, to tone with the points. In kittens the body colour may be muddy fawn.


Blue Tortie Point Edit
Blue Tortie Siamese

Points: Light blue with shades of cool toned cream.

Body Glacial white. Shading, if any, to tone with the points.

Chocolate Tortie Point Edit
Chocolate Tortie Siamese

Points: Milk chocolate with shades of red.

Body: Ivory. Shading, if any, to tone with the points.


Lilac Tortie Point Edit
Lilac Tortie Siamese

Points: Pinkish grey with shades of cool toned cream. As normal, the tortie colouration only occurs on female cats.

Body: Off-white (magnolia). Shading, if any, to tone with the points.

Cinnamon Tortie Point Edit
Cinnamon Tortie Siamese

Points: Warm cinnamon brown with shades of red.

Body: Ivory. Shading, if any, to tone with the points.


Caramel Tortie Point Edit
Caramel Tortie Siamese

Points: Dark brownish blue (in blue based) or brownish grey (in lilac/fawn based) with shades of apricot.

Body: Off-white. Shading, if any, to tone with the points.

Fawn Tortie Point Edit

Points: Warm pale rosy mushroom with shades of cream.

Body: Off-white (magnolia). Shading, if any, to tone with the points.


Seal Lynx Point Edit

Seal Lynx Point Siamese

Seal Lynx Point Siamese cats appeared in the 1950's, and resulted originally from a cross between a Siamese and a domestic tabby. They are now and have been for some time, fully pedigreed Siamese with clearly defined stripes on their points, pale bodies, brilliant blue eyes, spotted whisker pad, and thumb prints on their ears. Seal Lynx Points come in a variety of colours such as seal, blue, chocolate, lilac, red and even tortie!

Apricot Point Edit

Apricot Siamese

Eyes: Brilliant intense blue, the deeper the better.

Points: Mask, ears and tail hot cream with a soft metallic sheen which becomes more noticeable with maturity. The legs and feet will be slightly paler in colour but definite colour should show at the rear of the hind legs below the hock. Barring and striping on mask, legs and tail is permissible. "Freckles" may occur on nose, pads, lips, eyelids and ears. Slight freckling in a mature cat should not be penalised.

Body: Warm creamy white. Shading, if any, to tone with the points. Such shading may be uneven and an Apricot Point should be penalised for shading no more nor less severely than a Blue Point.

Nose Leather, Eye Rims & Paw Pads: Pink.


Caramel Point Edit

Caramel Point Siamese

Eyes: Brilliant intense blue, the deeper the better.

Points: Dark brownish blue (in blue based), brownish grey (in lilac/fawn based), matching on all points although the legs may be slightly paler in tone than the other points.

Body: Off white. Shading, if any, to tone with the points.

Nose Leather, Eye Rims & Paw Pads: Pinkish grey.

Fawn Point Edit

Fawn Point Siamese

Eyes: Brilliant intense blue, the deeper the better.

Points: Warm pale rosy mushroom. The legs may be slightly paler than the other points.

Body: Off white (magnolia). Shading, if any, to tone with the points.

Nose Leather, Eye Rims & Paw Pads: Pinkish fawn.


Cinnamon Point Edit

Cinnamon Point Siamese

Eyes: Brilliant intense blue, the deeper the better.

Points: Warm cinnamon brown. The legs may be slightly paler than the other points.

Body: Ivory. Shading, if any, to tone with the points.

Nose Leather & Eye Rims: Cinnamon brown.

Paw Pads: Pink to cinnamon brown.

Tabby Point Edit

Tabby Point Siamese

Eyes: Brilliant intense blue, the deeper the better. Points: The mask, legs and tail should all show clear tabby markings which should be the same colour on all points, although leg markings may be slightly paler in tone. Paler markings are acceptable in kittens.

Mask: Clearly defined stripes, especially around the eyes and nose, with a clearly defined "M" marking on the forehead, distinct stripes ("ribbons") on the cheeks and darkly spotted whisker pads. The stripes should not extend over the top of the head to form a "hood".

Ears: The edges of the ears should be the same colour as the markings on the mask with a central patch of paler colour resembling a thumb print. These thumb prints may be less apparent in dilute colours and may not be visible in Tortie Tabby Points.

Legs: Clearly defined varied sized broken stripes. Solid markings on back of hind legs. The leg markings may be slightly paler in tone than the other points, especially in Red and Cream Tabby Points.

Tail: Many varied sized, clearly defined rings ending in a solid tip which may show tortie markings in Tortie Tabby Points. The rings should be evident on the top of the tail as well as underneath it and should extend for the entire length of the tail.

Body: Pale, showing clear contrast with the points as in the equivalent solid-pointed Siamese. Any shading on the body will show the underlying tabby pattern which may be ticked, spotted, mackerel or classic. A Tabby Point should be penalised for shading no more nor less severely than the equivalent solid-pointed Siamese.


Seal Tabby Point Edit

Points: Clear seal-brown or near-black tabby markings. Nose leather seal brown or pink rimmed with seal brown. Eye rims seal brown or black. Paw pads seal brown or pink.

Body: Cream, deepening to pale warm fawn on the back. Tabby shading, if any, to tone with the points.

Blue Tabby Point Edit

Points: Clear light-blue tabby markings. Nose leather blue or pink rimmed with blue. Eye rims blue. Paw pads blue or pink.

Body: Glacial white, deepening to cool light blue on the back. Tabby shading, if any, to tone with the points.


Chocolate Tabby Point Edit

Points: Clear chocolate tabby markings which may be almost copper in tone. Cold, dark, near-seal markings are incorrect and should be penalised. Nose leather chocolate or pink rimmed with chocolate. Eye rims chocolate. Paw pads chocolate or pink.

Body: Ivory. Tabby shading, if any, to tone with the points.

Lilac Tabby Point Edit

Points: Clear pinkish-grey tabby markings. Nose leather faded lilac or pink rimmed with faded lilac. Eye rims faded lilac. Paw pads faded lilac or pink.

Body: Off-white (magnolia). Tabby shading, if any, to tone with the points.


Red Tabby Point Edit

Points: Clear bright reddish-gold tabby markings. Nose leather, eye rims and paw pads pink. "Freckles" may occur on nose, pads, lips, eyelids and ears. Slight freckling in a mature cat should not be penalised.

Body: White. Tabby shading, if any, to tone with the points.

Cream Tabby Point Edit

Points: Clear cool-toned cream tabby markings. A hot cream is incorrect and should be penalised. Nose leather, eye rims and paw pads pink. "Freckles" may occur on nose, pads, lips, eyelids and ears. Slight freckling in a mature cat should not be penalised.

Body: White, deepening to pale cream on back and sides. Tabby shading, if any, to tone with the points.


Cinnamon Tabby Point Edit
Cinnamon Tabby Point Siamese

Points: Clear warm cinnamon brown tabby markings. Nose leather cinnamon brown or pink rimmed with cinnamon brown. Eye rims cinnamon brown. Paw pads cinnamon brown or pink

Body: Ivory. Tabby shading, if any, to tone with the points.

Fawn Tabby Point Edit
Fawn Tabby Point Siamese

Points: Clear warm pale rosy mushroom tabby markings. Nose leather pinkish fawn or pink rimmed with pinkish fawn. Eye rims pinkish fawn. Paw pads pinkish fawn or pink

Body: Off-white (magnolia). Tabby shading, if any, to tone with the points.


Caramel Tabby Point Edit

Points: Clear dark brownish blue (in blue based) or brownish grey (in lilac/fawn based) tabby markings. Nose leather pinkish grey or pink rimmed with pinkish grey. Eye rims pinkish grey. Paw pads pinkish grey or pink.

Body: Off-white. Tabby shading, if any, to tone with the points.)

Apricot Tabby Point Edit

Points: Clear hot cream tabby markings with a soft metallic sheen which becomes more noticeable with maturity. Nose leather, eye rims and paw pads pink. "Freckles" may occur on nose, pads, lips, eyelids and ears. Slight freckling in a mature cat should not be penalised.

Body: Warm creamy white. Tabby shading, if any, to tone with the points.


Seal Tortie Tabby Point Edit

Points: Clear seal-brown or near-black tabby markings patched and/or mingled at random with shades of red. The ears may be mottled. The distribution and degree of red patching is immaterial. Nose leather and paw pads seal brown and/or pink. Eye rims seal brown or black and/or pink.

Body: Cream, deepening to pale warm fawn on the back. Tabby shading and tortie patching, if any, to tone with the points.

Blue Tortie Tabby Point Edit

Points: Clear light-blue tabby markings patched and/or mingled at random with shades of cream. The ears may be mottled. The distribution and degree of cream patching is immaterial. Nose leather, eye rims and paw pads blue and/or pink.

Body: Glacial white, deepening to cool light blue on the back. Tabby shading and tortie patching, if any, to tone with the points.


Chocolate Tortie Tabby Point Edit

Points: Clear chocolate tabby markings, which may be almost copper in tone, patched and/or mingled at random with shades of red. Cold, dark, near-seal markings are incorrect and should be penalised. The ears may be mottled. The distribution and degree of red patching is immaterial. Nose leather, eye rims and paw pads chocolate and/or pink.

Body: Ivory. Tabby shading and tortie patching, if any, to tone with the points.

Lilac Tortie Tabby Point Edit

Points: Clear pinkish-grey tabby markings patched and/or mingled at random with shades of cream. The ears may be mottled. The distribution and degree of cream patching is immaterial. Nose leather, eye rims and paw pads faded lilac and/or pink.

Body: Off white (magnolia). Tabby shading and tortie patching, if any, to tone with the points.


Cinnamon Tortie Tabby Point Edit
Cinnamon Tortie Tabby Point Siamese

Points: Clear warm cinnamon brown tabby markings patched and/or mingled at random with shades of red. The ears may be mottled. The distribution and degree of red patching is immaterial. Nose leather, eye rims and paw pads cinnamon brown and/or pink.

Body: Ivory. Tabby shading and tortie patching, if any, to tone with the points.

Fawn Tortie Tabby Point Edit
Fawn Tortie Tabby Point Siamese

Points: Clear warm pale rosy mushroom tabby markings patched and/or mingled at random with shades of cream. The ears may be mottled. The distribution and degree of cream patching is immaterial. Nose leather, eye rims and paw pads pinkish fawn and/or pink.

Body: Off-white (magnolia). Tabby shading and tortie patching, if any, to tone with the points.


Parti-Color Edit

Parti-Color Siamese

A brand new color which pures white spots on part of the legs, body and mask.

This color can be blue, chocolate, fawn, caramel and cinnamon.

Foreign White Edit

Foreign White Siamese

A Foreign White is merely a Siamese wearing a white overcoat as a disguise because the gene that produces a white coat is dominant masks any underlying colour. However, their vivid blue eyes, which are linked with the Siamese coat pattern, indicate their Siamese ancestry, and when mated to a Siamese will produce only Siamese kittens, whereas a Blue eyed Oriental White will produce a proportion of oriental kittens when mated to a Siamese.

Health Edit

Lillac Point Siamese kitten

A number of health issues, some of them hereditary, have been found in individual Siamese are listed below.

Hairballs Edit

Siamese, like most other cats, run the risk of developing hairballs. They groom themselves often, and more than likely will get a hairball at some point.

Brushing them as often as possible will help the situation, but there are other preventive measures you can take to help with hairball development.

Hairball formula food, such as Iams Hairball can help reduce the risk of developing hairballs. There are also malt flavored products that will loosen hairballs up.

Declawing Edit

We do not recommend declawing, as it is a painful and often unnecessary approach to take with your Siamese.

You can easily maintain your cat's claws by clipping them on a regular basis. Plastic caps are also available to help with scratching and clawing of furniture as an alternative. Buy a scratching post or turbo scratcher, and show your cat that it is ok to use these toys but not ok to claw up the furniture.

In our opinion, the only time declawing a cat should be considered is for medical reasons, or if very small children are present in the house and it is viewed to be a danger to the child and you want to keep your Siamese.

Siamese face

Teeth/Dental Edit

Brushing your cats teeth should be included in your maintenance schedule, and if you start early with a Siamese kitten, you will be surprised at just how easy it can be. Teeth that are not cared for properly will develop problems over time and the gums will become diseased. This can spread to other parts of the body and cause major health problems if not taken care of.

Beyond brushing, it may be a good idea to feed them plaque fighting treats and put a special fluoride solution in their water on a daily basis.

Vet Visits Edit

You will need to establish a relationship with a veterinarian that is close to your home. Your Siamese should be taken in on a regular basis to get required booster and rabies shots, and for health checkups.

Seal Point Siamese kitten

If your cat will be kept indoors (which we highly recommend) then it may not be necessary to get some of the shots that are available.

The main reason to establish a good relationship with a vet, is to be able to ask questions and monitor the health of your Siamese as they grow.

Use common sense and create an environment that your Siamese can be safe and have fun in. You will be glad you did!

In Popular CultureEdit

Siamese cats have been featured greatly in pop culture, here are some examples:

There is a Siamese webkinz, a popular online virtual pet game.

In 'The Lady and the Tramp', the two main antagonists are Siamese cats.

New Developments Edit

In the 1950s - 1960s, as the Siamese was increasing in popularity, many breeders and cat show judges began to favor the more slender look and as a result of generations of selective breeding, created increasingly long, fine-boned, narrow-headed cats; eventually the modern show Siamese was bred to be extremely elongated, with thin, tubular bodies, long, slender legs, a very long, very thin tail that tapers gradually into a point and long, narrow, wedge-shaped heads topped by extremely large, wide-set ears. The major cat organisations altered language and/or interpretation of their official breed standards to favor this newer streamlined type of Siamese, and the minority of breeders who stayed with the original style found that their cats were no longer competitive in the show ring.

Lillac Point Siamese

By the mid - 1980s, cats of the original style had disappeared from cat shows, but a few breeders, particularly in the UK, continued to breed and register them, resulting in today's two types of Siamese – the modern "show-style" Siamese, and the "traditional" Siamese, both descended from the same distant ancestors, but with few or no recent ancestors in common. In the late 1980s, breeders and fans of the older style of Siamese organised in order to preserve old, genetically healthy lines from extinction; educate the public about the breed's history; and provide information on where people could buy kittens of the more moderate type. Several different breeders' organisations have developed, with differing breed standards and requirements (such as whether or not cats must have documented proof of ancestry from an internationally recognised registry). Partially due to such disagreements, there are several different names used for the cats, including Traditional Siamese, Old Style Siamese, Classic siamese, and Appleheads (originally a derogatory nickname coined by modern-type Siamese breeders as an exaggerated description of less extremely wedge-shaped heads). The popularity of the older body style has also led to pointed mixed-breed cats that may have few or no Siamese ancestors being sold as "Traditional Siamese" to uninformed buyers, further increasing confusion over what a "real" Siamese looks like. The International Cat Association (TICA), in addition to the regular Siamese breed category in which modern show-style Siamese are shown, now accept a breed in the Preliminary New Breed Category called Thai, similar to the Thaikatze which are seen in Europe. The TICA Thai is recognised, which includes Siamese cats of the less extreme type or a Wichien-Maat imported from Thailand. The Thai is also recognized by the World Cat Federation. Thai are the original type of cats from Thailand, brought to America on January 3rd, 1879 as a gift from the American consul in Bangkok to the President's wife, Mrs. Lucy Webb Hayes.

Derived Breeds Edit

Siamese cat sitting
  1. Balinese – a longhaired Siamese. In the largest US registry, the Cat Fanciers Association (CFA), limited to the four traditional Siamese coat colours of seal point, blue point (a dilute of seal point), chocolate point and lilac point (a dilute of chocolate point). Other registries in the US and worldwide recognise a greater diversity of colours.
  2. Burmese is a breed of domesticated cats descended from a specific cat Wong Mau who was found in Burma in 1930 by Dr. Joseph Cheesman Thompson. She was brought to San Francisco, California, where she was bred with Siamese. While technically not derived from Siamese, the breed was considered to be a form of Siamese for many years, leading to cross-breeding.
  3. Colorpoint Shorthair – a Siamese-type cat registered in CFA with pointed coat colours aside from the traditional CFA Siamese coat colours; originally developed by crosses with other shorthair cats. Considered to be part of the Siamese breed in all other cat associations, but considered a separate breed in CFA. Variations can include Lynx Points and Tortie Points.
  4. Himalayan - Long-haired breed originally derived from crosses of Persians to Siamese and pointed Domestic Longhair cats in order to introduce the point markings and the colors chocolate and lilac. After these initial crosses were used to introduce the colors, further breed development was performed by crossing these cats only to the Persian breed. In Europe, they are referred to as colourpoint Persians. In CFA they are a colour division of the Persian breed.
  5. Javanese – a longhaired version of the Colorpoint Shorthair in CFA. In Europe, an obsolete term for the longhaired version of the Oriental Shorthair.
  6. Ocicat – a spotted cat originally produced by a cross between Siamese and Abyssinian.
  7. Oriental Shorthair – a Siamese-style cat in non-pointed coat patterns and colours, including solid, tabby, silver/smoke, and tortoise-shell.
  8. Oriental Longhair – a longhaired version of the Oriental Shorthair.
  9. Snowshoe – a cream and white breed with blue eyes and some points that was produced through the cross-breeding of the Siamese and bi-coloured American Shorthair in the 1960s.
  10. Tonkinese – a cross between a Siamese cat and a Burmese. The Tonkinese are pointed cats but their bodies are of a darker colour than the Siamese.
  11. Thai – A pointed cat also called the Thaikatzen or Wichien-Maat, which represents the early 20th century Siamese, and can still be found in Thailand catteries (in Thailand called Wichien-Maat).
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